One Summer, Many Worlds

Day Long Facebook Party Celebrating Young Adult Science Fiction! I am SO excited to be part of the fabulous Denise Grover Swank’s FB party celebrating YA SF. I can’t believe I’m included with the rest of these amazing authors. As you can see below, there’s quite a line up here, and the party goes all day long, with TONS of giveaways, so stop by when you can and enter. Guest hosts: Jamie Grey, Susan Kaye Quinn, Elana Johnson , Amy Bartol, LeighAnn Kopans, Brenda Pandos, Eisley Jacobs, Theresa Veraa,Gennifer Albin, MG Buehrlen, Denise Grover Swank, Trisha Leigh ZiegenhornMANY prizes will be given away: $100 iBooks, Amazon, or B&N gift card GRAND PRIZE.     Hop over to join the party   I’ll be giving away… A signed paperback copy of Ultraviolet Catastrophe and The Star Thief  (US Only) CLICK HERE TO ENTER Blog this! Recommend on Facebook Share on Google+ share via Reddit Share with Stumblers Share on technorati Tumblr it Tweet about it Subscribe to the comments on this post Print for later Bookmark in Browser Tell a...

Cover Reveal – Fortune’s Risk (A Star Thief Novella)

So, a few weeks ago, Hafsah at Icey books held a cover reveal for Athena’s Ashes, the sequel to The Star Thief. (You can still stop by and enter to win a copy!) I am SO happy that so many of you liked it – thank you all for the kind words! I’m really excited about sharing this book with all of you. But, I know that it’s still a few more months before the planned release date at the end of August which can be frustrating when you’re waiting for a sequel. (If you still haven’t picked up a copy of The Star Thief, I’ll be putting it on sale for one day only – June 14th! So keep an eye out for the announcement!) So for those Star Thief fans who need something to tide them over, I’m happy to announce that I’ll be releasing a novella in early July that bridges the gap between the two books (though it’s mostly standalone). And today I wanted to share the cover with you. I’m in love with it. My designer did another amazing job! We went back and forth for a while on the concept, but I think what we came up with works really well! What do you guys think?   Captain Nick Finn has spent the last seven years trying to escape his drug-running past and become the perfect MYTH soldier. At the peak of his military career, he should be leading missions to capture the galaxy’s most wanted criminals. Instead, he’s stranded on a stolen MYTH ship with Viktis, a notorious pirate and an unlikely...

A Cover Reveal, an Update, and a Short Story walked into a bar…

Hello Lovelies! This is one of those posts about everything and nothing, so please for give me if I’m all over the place! This week was awesome. The amazing Hafsah at Icey Books unveiled the cover of my next Star Thief Novel – Athena’s Ashes. Stop by and check it out and you can enter to win an ARC! You can also add it to your Goodreads list here. My amazing cover designer Christa and I finalized the final cover for Fortune’s Risk – the bridge novella between Star Thief and Athena’s Ashes. It follows Finn and Viktis while they’re on the run from MYTH. It’s got adventure, suspense, and even a little unexpected romance! I plan on sharing the cover soon. But in the mean time, you can add it to Goodreads. (Also – if you haven’t signed up for my newsletter yet, you may want to. There will be a special treat for my subscribers just before Fortune’s Risk comes out! And I promise I’ll never spam you.) I’m also going to be taking part in the SFR Brigade’s Starry Night Blog hop in June. Stay tuned for more details, there are some amazing giveaway items! Ok, I think that’s it. Now back to the revision cave! Hope you’re all doing well and for my US friends, have a Happy Memorial Day weekend!     Blog this! Recommend on Facebook Share on Google+ share via Reddit Share with Stumblers Share on technorati Tumblr it Tweet about it Subscribe to the comments on this post Print for later Bookmark in Browser Tell a...

DIVIDE Blog Tour – The Challenge with Fairytales

Guys! Today I have something special for you. I’m SO pleased to be part of author Jessa Russo’s blog tour for her fab new book DIVIDE, a retelling of Beauty and the Beast, with a few amazing twists and I HIGHLY recommend it! Today, Jessa’s here to talk a bit about the challenges and highlights she faced while writing a fairytale retelling. Take it away, Jessa!   I’d say the biggest challenge in writing a fairytale retelling is, to put it simply: staying true to the fairytale, while making your version completely unique and one-of-a-kind. Seems easy enough, right? But it’s not. Because you run the risk of either straying so far from the original that your readers don’t know they’re even reading a redux, or, on the other hand, you may go the opposite direction and write something so similar that readers know exactly what’s going to happen at every turn. This would be boring, no? If I’d written something too much like Beauty and the Beast, what’s the point in reading it, right? Just go read the original or remember the Disney version from your youth. But if my version is so far removed from the original(s), then it’s not really a redux. So, sigh. In comes the dilemma. I wanted to give readers a story that stuck to the original—or, more honestly, that stuck to the Disney version, since that’s really where my inspiration came from—but I wanted my version to have a few twists and turns that readers weren’t expecting. Sure, there’s a centuries-old family curse, and a beast, but . . . there’s also...

Out Today: GYPSY by @trishaleighKC

You guys! I’m SO excited. Today is the release day for GYPSY (The Cavy files) by the amazing Trisha Leigh. I have a special place in my heart for this book. A few months ago, Trisha asked if I’d read it and provide a blurb if I liked it. This was the first time I’d been asked to blurb as an author and talk about an honor! I’ve been a HUGE fan of Trisha’s forever, and for her to ask me to read and blurb pretty much made my year. Of course there’s always the worry that you won’t like the book, but OMG you guys. I couldn’t put this one down. I fell in love with Gypsy, and the world that Trisha built. Her writing is absolutely gorgeous, and I ended staying up all night so I could finish it. I’m waiting desperately for the next book now! This is what I had to say about it: “Smart, suspenseful, and full of amazing science, I fell in love with Gypsy from the first page. The constant threat of danger, the hint of romance, and the mysterious backdrop of Charleston hit all the right notes. I devoured this book, desperate to uncover the secrets behind the Cavies and their strange abilities. Gypsy is the kind of YA Sci-fi I love, with believable characters, fantastic relationships, and a plot that kept me turning the pages well into the night. Trisha Leigh has written one of my favorite books of 2014 and I can’t wait to see what happens to Gypsy and the other Cavies next!”   So – in honor of release week, Trisha...

A Writer’s Guide to Hustlers, Harlots and Heroes

I am SO pleased to have Krista Ball on my blog today to talk about her newest book –  Husters, Harlots, and Heroes: A Regenc and Steampunk Field Guide. This is the follow up to her previous book – What Kings Ate and Wizards Drank. Both of these are invaluable research tools for writers, and even better? They’re SO much fun to read! So, without further ado, here’s Krista!   I came into Hustlers, Harlots and Heroes with a good grounding in what “poor” looked like in a Georgian or Victorian setting. However, I wanted to know what everyone out there saw as “poor”. I turned to social media and posed the question, “When you think of the Regency era, who do you consider poor?” The Regency period is just a small period that this book intersects, but it is a trendy time period. If you know of the Regency period, it’s probably because of Jane Austen. Perhaps you own all of her books, movies, modern variations, and manners guides. On the other hand, perhaps you were forced to watch Pride and Prejudice in 1995 by your university sweetheart and still mourn the loss of those six hours. So I asked the question and the list was nearly all of upper middle class to upper class women deemed as “poor.” None of these women were allowed or expected to work. They had servants and relied on the charity and good-will of others. Now, having a servant or helper wasn’t unusual for impoverished people of the era; this was a time before microwave ovens and laundry machines. But consider, however poor...